Work is the refuge of people who have nothing better to do. : Oscar Wilde

Monday, June 2, 2014

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Anxious Before Job Interview: Good!

Although the evidence discussed in this work isn't directly relevant it does suggest that feeling some anxiety prior to attending a job interview might improve your performance in it. Tell youself, "I'm excited" rather than trying to calm yourself.

Sunday, January 5, 2014

Where the Jobs Are for New Economics PhDs

According to Chris Auld (Associate Professor, University of Victoria) the number of vacancies for new PhDs in economics from 2009 to 2013 increased from about 200 to 350. He based his estimates on job listings from the American Economics Association 'Job Openings for Economists' spreadsheets for the months of October for these years. He offers a breakdown indicating which specialities are more in demand; I won't pretend to understand what any of them might be. If you're interested at all in advanced studies in this field you might wish to look here.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Website gets man a job

I would say that this is a bit of a rare occurrence. After all, there are many millions of websites and you need to be very lucky to be noticed. Another factor to bear in mind is that your sense of humour may differ from those of many employers. Still Witty website lands unemployed designer a job, and you never know.

Sunday, December 8, 2013

Compassion Fatigue: Even in the Strongest


I have no idea how work in career development might rank as a potential source of stress that would lead to compassion fatigue. On the other hand, I would expect that some individuals would have rendered themselves almost immune to it as a result of long and successful practice and of learning ways of coping.

Apparently not.

Here's an account of some of the experience of Dr John Bradford a psychiatrist who lived with some of the aftermath of the gruesome activities of Air Force Colonel Russell Williams. It's worth being kept aware that we are all built to feel.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Study Advice from Top Students

Someone on quora.com has asked:

"How do top students study?
"If you went to or are going to a top school like MIT, Harvard, Columbia, IIT, Berkeley, Stanford, Cornell, Caltech, Princeton, Yale, Brown, what is your studying method?"

There are about 41 responses so far. Some of the responses contradict each other, and I would not be able to follow some of the advice that is offered myself. But maybe you're a student and could use at least some of it.

Here. (You might need to join quora, which is easy.)

Monday, October 14, 2013

Doreen Kimura, On Ada Lovelace Day

This is the day in the calendar year when one is supposed to write about a women in a STEM occupation whose contributions one admires—a woman who does or has done something admirable somewhere in Science, Technology, Mathematics, Engineering or Mathematics. The day is named for the first woman to write computer code, Ada Lovelace.

I'm going to write a tiny bit about Doreen Kimura who was a professor and neuroscientist at Simon Fraser University. She died in February at the age of about 80. Some of her research had to do with how cognitive abilities differed between the sexes. When I read about research like that I usually think how little it matters for individuals. Simply put, there's overlap in every ability between the sexes.

However, at least in the articles I've read about her on the 'net, Kimura is resolutely forthright and honest. She opposed affirmative action. In her wikipedia article it says that she thought this demeaning to women. In the article on science.ca I understand her to say that forcing people into unsuitable careers can make them miserable. (And career developers could hardly disagree.)

So, Kimura found differences but didn't think that this meant that society should try to make up the difference—or something like that!

I cannot say that I admire Kimura for the results of her research. I really don't care whether men are better at dealing with mathematics and three-dimensional shapes, or whether women are better at spatial arrangements for that matter. I have enjoyed reading about someone who seems to separate issues clearly and to speak their mind about them. (I would like people to have the freedom and the resources to pursue possibilities of their choosing.)