Work is the refuge of people who have nothing better to do. : Oscar Wilde

Monday, December 29, 2008

Setting Up a Job Seeker's Work Bench, I

So why would a job seeker want or need a work bench?
  • To avoid making mistakes that could cost us a job or a better job offer.
  • Because details make some of us crazy.
  • To make the whole job seeking project more manageable.
  • To leave time for lots of networking and creative effort—and others areas of life that will keep us healthy.
What facilities must a work bench include?
  • Calendar for recording networking calls to be made, appointments, deadlines, not to mention public holidays and personal obligations.
  • An email client for submitting job applications and other correspondence.
  • Word processing program for preparing resumés, covering letters and other marketing documents.
  • Simple contact management system for recording information about networking contacts, recruiters, supervisory and other personnel in potential employers, people who might provide references, etc.
  • An organised place to store job advertisements and all items that have been sent in response to those advertisements.
  • A place to store a few versions of one's resumé for use in responding to any given opportunity.
  • Web browser.
  • RSS feed reader (yes, really).
  • Printer for making networking cards (optional).
Additional desirable facilities
  • A place for storing an ePortfolio would be great. It would replace, or largely replace a cache of alternative resumés. However, that discussion is beyond the scope of this first blog item.
Assumptions for subsequence articles(s) in this series
  • Windows platform
  • Basic skills on the part of job seekers: email, word processing, file selection and so on.
  • No grand expectations about software capabilities on the part of job seekers such as sales personnel might have for their contact management programs!
  • These suggestions are meant to be very down to earth.
Please tell me if they are not.

Sunday, December 28, 2008

Marketing Job Seekers, III

It's been some time since I dipped into Seth Godin's marketing principles at What do you know? My long-time readers will know that I like looking at these because many are so applicable to marketing job seekers. Let me look at two again this time.

Marketing begins before the product is created.

If you need to earn a living, or will need to do so, then this is for you. When you enter or re-enter the job market what "product" or "product package" will you be? (And I don't mean how will you fake it!) How will you choose goals for yourself so that the person you become, with all of the experience and qualifications that you gather, will constitute a marketable product?

Doing the research and thinking that leads to reasonable answers to that question is the marketing to which Godin is referring. You need to do it with your career too.

Fundamentally, will there be jobs in the occupation that I favour? If there will be then will certain special or additional qualifications render me more appealing as a recruit? Are there any things that I might do that would eliminate me from competition? Having taken some decisions early on I would remain open to information that would help me to weigh course corrections.

Marketing is the way your people answer the phone, the typesetting on your bills and your returns policy.

About a year ago I took on the task of hiring an English teacher for people who had been injured at work. It's possible that I could have asked someone to make the job interview appointments for me but I like doing these things for myself.

First impressions are amazingly strong—right or wrong. One or two candidates made it quite difficult for me to consider them seriously by displaying so little vigour during initial telephone conversations. The moral is simple: when you have job applications in process—or at any time really—you're marketing yourself. Try to be bright and cheery.

Wednesday, December 24, 2008

Imitation is the Sincerest Form of Flattery

Perhaps so. However, an increasing number of social psychological studies have shown that we human beings mimic one another automatically. Still, when we do mimic others, not only does this increase empathy it can also yield actual monetary payoffs. (For a summary see van Baaren et al.)

What's in this for job seekers? Well, although I cannot cite empirical evidence it does seem quite possible that these social psychological results support the advice that is commonly given to those being interviewed: to wear attire that is approximately like that likely to be worn by their interviewers. Clearly the idea is to mimic the visual appearance of those to whom you want to appeal.

Beyond that, when we as career developers are trained to interview clients we are told to try to adopt the clients' language as a way of increasing rapport and in the hope that this will make it easier for clients to present all that needs to be discussed. Most of us find that attention to posture and other forms of mimicry also help.

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

Hosting an "Open Weekend" at KnowCoach

Having spent a long time working in IT I am aware of the vast breadth and depth of information available to practitioners in that arena of work. In contrast, although much guidance is offered for people who want to create resumés or to prepare for job interviews (say) there is almost nothing for those of us who want to become better career development practitioners.

I believe that a partial answer to this knowledge vacuum involves more frequent active sharing of information and ideas and, just as important, the recording of this stuff for re-use.

<rant ends here>

30 January (Friday) through 1 February (Sunday) : come and join me and other career developers, this time for an ...

Exchange of Information About Online Assessment Instruments
  • Share advice and information about free and commercial online assessment instruments.
  • I will demonstrate a novel approach to the creation on online cardsorts that can be applied in a wide variety of contexts that you might find interesting (or not)—that doesn't use any cards.
  • Let's try to accumulate enough information to begin building an article in Wikipedia!
Just register on KnowCOACH.ca if you have not already done so and then register on this Open Weekend. You can drop by at any time from noon (PST) on the Friday through noon (PST) on the Sunday. Bring something. Take something. Ask a question. Whatever.

London & Windsor (Ontario) Added to Indexed Job Bank Pages

The listings of jobs from the Job Bank that I word-index on title and present in NOC-sorted order now include listings for Windsor and London. (Someone who has been using the pages that have been in existence for a while is still looking, I regret to say, and asked me to add these areas.) If you have never taken a look at these just follow the link that is listed to the right labelled "Job Bank Ads ..." and let me know what you think.

I have also had to modify the codes that produce these listings because the format of some of the Job Bank pages changed. If you notice mistakes in the listings I would be obliged if you would inform me.

Monday, December 22, 2008

Spiffing Way to Display eResumes & ePortfolios

What you see here is just a small image of the resumé. If you click on "Open resume in its own page" though you'll see a version of the document big enough to read. The item you offer can contain photos and other images, graphs—anything that you can put into a PDF. And nowadays since you can make PDFs from practically anything that's printable (I use PDFCreator to do this) you can put almost anything into one of these documents.

This is issuu.com and it's free.

Thursday, December 18, 2008

Wanna Make a Cardsort on the Web?

This video clip shows a web page based on the "Personal Values Card Sort" of W.R. Miller et al, of the University of New Mexico (2001). These authors indicates that their "instrument is in the public domain and may be copied adapted and used without permission".

Anyone who plays Solitaire/Patience or Freecell on his computer knows that software capable of providing animated card sorts on the screen is nothing new. What some folks may not be aware of is just how easy it has become to produce many different card sorts and to provide them either on stand-alone computers or via the web.

To come straight to the point what you see here was adapted from code I found at Graphics by Greg. Greg's code is based on fabulous Javascript libraries called prototype and scriptaculous. Oddly, I encountered his stuff and then read a certain amount of the scriptaculous documentation before realising that his script would make most of the card sorts that career developers might need. But there's more power in reserve, in scriptaculous, if we need it.






Making new card sorts involves more tedium than head scratching because it's mainly a matter of changing column headings and column widths, and of course the items that we want clients to sort. If you know how to use (say) macros in Microsoft Word or, better still, some form of scripting language you can make your life much easier.

Oceans of client head space to explore!

PS: I used Wink to make this little video. Fantastic software product.

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Chat Session on E-Portfolios Tomorrow (18 Dec)

Dec 18, 2008, 3:30 PM PST: E-Portfolios (1 hour)

The e-Portfolio group, led by Lynne Wolters, will host a discussion of the definitions, process, benefits and uses of e-Portfolios [on Tapped In]. An e-Portfolio is a digital collection of artifacts (texts, videos, images, audio, etc.) which a student (or teacher) assembles and presents to reflect on and publish as a demonstration of learning. Please join us to discuss what you've done, thought about, planned, or heard of in the field of e-Portfolios. Experienced users, exploring beginners, confused learners, all are welcome.

Note: that's Pacific Standard Time.

Saturday, December 13, 2008

Constructivism in Teaching vs Career Development: One Point of Comparison

Constructivist teachers aim to help their students to learn how to learn as well as to master various curricula. Constructivist career developers have parallel goals. We want each client to make meaningful choices for the immediate future and we also want the client to take away the ability to continue making choices that will be meaningful for them. The strategies that career developers and teachers employ must differ somewhere, however, and here's why.

Here's what one source says about constructivist teaching:

'For example: Groups of students in a science class are discussing a problem in physics. Though the teacher knows the "answer" to the problem, she focuses on helping students restate their questions in useful ways. She prompts each student to reflect on and examine his or her current knowledge. When one of the students comes up with the relevant concept, the teacher seizes upon it, and indicates to the group that this might be a fruitful avenue for them to explore.' [Concept to Classroom in What is Constructivism?]

In a subject like physics the teacher does (almost always) know the answer and can discern if a student has offered a relevant concept. In contrast, although there are career developers who think they know what would be best for their clients we do not know "the answer". That is to say, we do not know what would be best for the client. Indeed it is solely within the the client's ability to determine whether they have found an acceptable solution to their problem

(I have been looking for websites that might be valuable to career developers wishing to offer constructivist support to clients. As part of this I have been looking at sites for teachers.)

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

No One True Reality

"There is no one true reality - rather, individual interpretations of the world."

I just read that quotation from the work of Clements & Battista at "Constructivism. Putting the social into e-learning". In the context of career development I would say that there is no one true occupation, or set of true occupations, for any individual. Rather it is for the individual to navigate a life career that has meaning for her or him, taking into account both work and all other aspects of life.

The entire article is well worth reading. However, what really caught my eye was the author's proposal for a personal learning environment (PLE), especially as it was supported by a good video. Wendy Drexler's video sketches a PLE built up of the current technological tools, notably RSS readers. In the area of employment I have been working on the clear parallel to PLEs like this, where various RSS feeds and other resources are made conveniently available to all so that they can configure their own career exploration environments. In this constructivist model part of the role of the career developer would be to support clients in using the tools as well as with using the techniques already associated with constructivist practice.

The recent blog about making an filtered feed for retiredworker.ca was just about the nuts and bolts of this enterprise.

Saturday, December 6, 2008

retiredworker.ca: Making a Better News Feed

My main complaint about this job site is the one that I have about all of them (except the Job Bank). It is that it's search facilities are not nearly as good as they could easily be. retireworker.ca does have one advantage over a few other sites though: it offers an RSS feed listing available jobs. The principle shortcoming with the RSS feed is that it covers all of the jobs that this site has for Canada. How many of us want to read through all those headings in the feed?

One of the great things about RSS feeds is that they can be manipulated by software, and various developers have started creating products for doing that which require only limited software skills for simple applications. One of these products is Yahoo! Pipes.

Again, our objective here is to overcome some of the short-comings of this site. When we sift through jobs we look for suitable occupations and reasonable travelling or commuting distances. Here I've copied the retireworker.ca RSS feed URL into the Pipes "Fetch Feed" widget for processing and so that I could see what fields the feed contains. I had been hoping that the feed might indicate the city and province for each job. It doesn't so I will be content with limiting the output stream to jobs in just one province, Ontario. (I could limit it further with more advanced techniques.) I need to look for the word "Ontario" in the "title" field. If it is present then I will accept the job; otherwise, I will omit it.

At least this reduces the effort required on the part of the person reviewing jobs. Note, too, that most of us would be following more than one jobs feed. It is thus very worthwhile making each feed somewhat more compact as a source.

To complete the "pipe" I add the "Filter" widget which accepts only those jobs that mention "Ontario" in the title and the "Pipe Output" widget that makes this RSS feed available to the outside world.







Finally, add the feed into your favourite reader and watch for jobs. Here's how the feed looks in Newsgator.

Friday, December 5, 2008

Getting Enough Stuff to Read, II

Have a look at the Ebooks search engine. Being ever so slightly compulsive about finding sources and ideas about career development, my first search on this site was for "career". Apparently this engine makes no attempt to provide exhaustive results: this query returned only 30 items. Nor does it filter duplicates. However, I did find some attractive items.
--
See my first post in this series for another approach to the vexing problem of Getting Enough Stuff to Read.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Job Ad Counts for November 2008

The table summarises advertisements that appeared on the Job Bank in November for Brantford and area, Hamilton and area and Niagara and area. From now on it will be published with the indexed Job Bank listings to make it more convenient for job seekers. I am also putting a link to those listings in the righthand column of this blog.

My thanks are definitely due to Ken Walker of John Howard in Hamilton for this suggestion.

Sunday, November 30, 2008

TappedIn : Not Only for Teachers

Although tappedin was designed primarily for teachers there’s some worthwhile stuff for anyone who facillitates groups and even for those of us whose principal focus is on employment and career development. For example, on the 18th of December I see a session about ePortfolios.

Membership is free. Note the RSS feed available at the bottom of each calendar page.

PS : Very friendly and helpful. It's late Sunday afternoon and somebody calling themself “BjB” is there to guide me around the site. Thank you!

Thursday, November 27, 2008

You Might Find Meaning in Your Current Job

Although I have not taken the time to unearth any statistics about it a lot of people are unhappy in their jobs. One strategy that these unhappy people often adopt is to seek a change of occupation. Magnusson (1992) advises career developers to discuss any change with clients but clearly this kind of change could carry some important implications. When I first read Peavy's (1997) ideas about reframing and reconstructing a client's perceptions about their place in the world by exploring new or altered meanings I rather wondered whether I could meet the challenge of learning yet another body of abstruse theory. I was enormously relieved when I started reading examples of counselling outcomes in which worthwhile results were achieved that did not require pages of explanation.

Constructivism as it applies to careers has to do with supporting clients in finding ways of making what they do, or might do, meaningful within frames of reference that they create for themselves. Not everyone will need to find a different job or a different occupation. Most of us could benefit from seeing some aspect of our lives in some more constructive way.

That's why I was so interested to read "Revisit the Joys of Your Job" today. I have not read any of the original accounts--and I have suppressed any questions I might have about a possible Hawthorne effect for the time being. It just looks like a very interesting approach.

K Magnusson (1992) Career Counselling Techniques, Life-Role Development Group, Edmonton.
RV Peavy (1997) SocioDynamic Counselling : A Constructivist Perspective, Trafford.

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Writing a Thank-you is Good for You

When you have attended an interview with a potential employer you should send the interviewers a thank-you, right? This is supposed to make you stand out as a candidate but I imagine that everybody on the planet knows about doing this by now so surely it can't be that effective any more, can it?

But how about this? According to Steven Toepfer of Kent State University showing gratitude is actually good for you—see Want to be Happier? Be More Grateful. As the man says, to be of benefit to you your letter will:
  • “be positively expressive”
  • show “some insight and reflection”
  • be “nontrivial” and,
  • contain a “high level of appreciation or gratitude.”
You can get ready to make your letter “nontrivial” during the interview itself when you are inevitably trying to gain insights about the employer and their needs. Soon after the interview you will begin the process of reflecting on your observations. And when you write your thank-you some of these initial insights and reflections can be included for bonus points with the employer.

Meanwhile, your efforts expended toward writing a worthwhile thank-you will help you build upon your own resources of well-being for further career exploration, as Toepfer points out.

Thursday, November 6, 2008

Job Ad Counts for October 2008

This table summarises advertisements that appeared on the Job Bank in October for Brantford and area, Hamilton and area and Niagara and area.

There were, for instance, 160 ads of one kind or another for ‘Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks’, as usual the group in greatest demand. A little down the list, there were 55 for ‘Light Duty Cleaners.’


160 advertisements
6421 Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks

85 advertisements
9619 Other Labourers in Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities

62 advertisements
6453 Food and Beverage Servers

58 advertisements
1453 Customer Service, Information and Related Clerks

56 advertisements
6641 Food Counter Attendants, Kitchen Helpers and Related Occupations

55 advertisements
6661 Light Duty Cleaners

52 advertisements
6242 Cooks

49 advertisements
7265 Welders and Related Machine Operators

46 advertisements
7452 Material Handlers

34 advertisements for each of the following :
6651 Security Guards and Related Occupations
7611 Construction Trades Helpers and Labourers

31 advertisements for each of the following :
1414 Receptionists and Switchboard Operators
7411 Truck Drivers
7414 Delivery and Courier Service Drivers

30 advertisements
6471 Visiting Homemakers, Housekeepers and Related Occupations

29 advertisements
6411 Sales Representatives - Wholesale Trade (Non-Technical)

27 advertisements
6221 Technical Sales Specialists - Wholesale Trade

26 advertisements for each of the following :
6663 Janitors, Caretakers and Building Superintendents
7311 Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics (Except Textile)

25 advertisements
6435 Hotel Front Desk Clerks

23 advertisements
1411 General Office Clerks

21 advertisements for each of the following :
6433 Airline Sales and Service Agents
7231 Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors

20 advertisements for each of the following :
1431 Accounting and Related Clerks
1433 Customer Service Representatives - Financial Services
3152 Registered Nurses

18 advertisements
6662 Specialized Cleaners

17 advertisements for each of the following :
1221 Administrative Officers
1471 Shippers and Receivers

16 advertisements for each of the following :
4212 Community and Social Service Workers
6231 Insurance Agents and Brokers
8612 Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance Labourers

15 advertisements for each of the following :
7263 Structural Metal and Platework Fabricators and Fitters
9617 Labourers in Food, Beverage and Tobacco Processing

14 advertisements for each of the following :
4131 College and Other Vocational Instructors
4167 Recreation, Sports and Fitness Program Supervisors and Consultants
6623 Other Elemental Sales Occupations

13 advertisements for each of the following :
4214 Early Childhood Educators and Assistants
6233 Retail and Wholesale Buyers
6611 Cashiers

12 advertisements for each of the following :
7242 Industrial Electricians
8431 General Farm Workers

11 advertisements for each of the following :
3233 Licensed Practical Nurses
4216 Other Instructors
6465 Other Protective Service Occupations
6622 Grocery Clerks and Store Shelf Stockers
7321 Automotive Service Technicians, Truck and Bus Mechanics and Mechanical Repairers

10 advertisements for each of the following :
1231 Bookkeepers
6451 Maîtres d'hôtel and Hosts/Hostesses
7271 Carpenters
7441 Residential and Commercial Installers and Servicers
8432 Nursery and Greenhouse Workers

9 advertisements for each of the following :
2253 Drafting Technologists and Technicians
9495 Plastic Products Assemblers, Finishers and Inspectors

8 advertisements for each of the following :
1435 Collectors
2131 Civil Engineers
3414 Other Assisting Occupations in Support of Health Services
6241 Chefs
7312 Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics

7 advertisements for each of the following :
1226 Conference and Event Planners
1441 Administrative Clerks
1475 Dispatchers and Radio Operators
2234 Construction Estimators
4141 Secondary School Teachers
5254 Program Leaders and Instructors in Recreation, Sport and Fitness
6452 Bartenders
6482 Estheticians, Electrologists and Related Occupations
7219 Contractors and Supervisors, Other Construction Trades, Installers, Repairers and Servicers
7282 Concrete Finishers
7313 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanics
7322 Motor Vehicle Body Repairers
9213 Supervisors, Food, Beverage and Tobacco Processing
9511 Machining Tool Operators
9514 Metalworking Machine Operators
9612 Labourers in Metal Fabrication

6 advertisements for each of the following :
1114 Other Financial Officers
1215 Supervisors, Recording, Distributing and Scheduling Occupations
1474 Purchasing and Inventory Clerks
2133 Electrical and Electronics Engineers
2242 Electronic Service Technicians (Household and Business Equipment)
5124 Professional Occupations in Public Relations and Communications
6215 Cleaning Supervisors
7421 Heavy Equipment Operators (Except Crane)
9611 Labourers in Mineral and Metal Processing

5 advertisements for each of the following :
1472 Storekeepers and Parts Clerks
1473 Production Clerks
6683 Other Elemental Service Occupations
7251 Plumbers
7351 Stationary Engineers and Auxiliary Equipment Operators
7412 Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators
9422 Plastics Processing Machine Operators

4 advertisements for each of the following :
1225 Purchasing Agents and Officers
1461 Mail, Postal and Related Clerks
2141 Industrial and Manufacturing Engineers
2211 Chemical Technologists and Technicians
2225 Landscape and Horticulture Technicians and Specialists
4153 Family, Marriage and Other Related Counsellors
5221 Photographers
5241 Graphic Designers and Illustrators
6211 Retail Trade Supervisors
6212 Food Service Supervisors
6252 Bakers
7241 Electricians (Except Industrial and Power System)
7253 Gas Fitters
7443 Automotive Mechanical Installers and Servicers
7621 Public Works and Maintenance Labourers
7622 Railway and Motor Transport Labourers
9461 Process Control and Machine Operators, Food and Beverage Processing
9482 Motor Vehicle Assemblers, Inspectors and Testers
9492 Furniture and Fixture Assemblers and Inspectors
9613 Labourers in Chemical Products Processing and Utilities

3 advertisements for each of the following :
1111 Financial Auditors and Accountants
1122 Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management
1223 Personnel and Recruitment Officers
1241 Secretaries (Except Legal and Medical)
1422 Data Entry Clerks
2132 Mechanical Engineers
2161 Mathematicians, Statisticians and Actuaries
2174 Computer Programmers and Interactive Media Developers
2232 Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians
2252 Industrial Designers
3235 Other Technical Occupations in Therapy and Assessment
3411 Dental Assistants
3413 Nurse Aides, Orderlies and Patient Service Associates
4112 Lawyers and Quebec Notaries
4152 Social Workers
4213 Employment Counsellors
6621 Service Station Attendants
6671 Operators and Attendants in Amusement, Recreation and Sport
7261 Sheet Metal Workers
7294 Painters and Decorators
8256 Supervisors, Landscape and Horticulture
9411 Machine Operators, Mineral and Metal Processing
9421 Chemical Plant Machine Operators
9451 Sewing Machine Operators
9483 Electronics Assemblers, Fabricators, Inspectors and Testers

2 advertisements for each of the following :
1112 Financial and Investment Analysts
1211 Supervisors, General Office and Administrative Support Clerks
1212 Supervisors, Finance and Insurance Clerks
1242 Legal Secretaries
1244 Court Recorders and Medical Transcriptionists
1424 Telephone Operators
1432 Payroll Clerks
1454 Survey Interviewers and Statistical Clerks
2171 Information Systems Analysts and Consultants
2233 Industrial Engineering and Manufacturing Technologists and Technicians
2243 Industrial Instrument Technicians and Mechanics
2262 Engineering Inspectors and Regulatory Officers
2281 Computer Network Technicians
2282 User Support Technicians
3222 Dental Hygienists and Dental Therapists
4142 Elementary School and Kindergarten Teachers
4211 Paralegal and Related Occupations
6216 Other Service Supervisors
6251 Butchers, Meat Cutters and Fishmongers - Retail and Wholesale
6271 Hairstylists and Barbers
6474 Babysitters, Nannies and Parents' Helpers
6483 Pet Groomers and Animal Care Workers
6682 Ironing, Pressing and Finishing Occupations
7211 Supervisors, Machinists and Related Occupations
7212 Contractors and Supervisors, Electrical Trades and Telecommunications Occupations
7222 Supervisors, Motor Transport and Other Ground Transit Operators
7272 Cabinetmakers
7281 Bricklayers
7283 Tilesetters
7291 Roofers and Shinglers
7295 Floor Covering Installers
7342 Tailors, Dressmakers, Furriers and Milliners
8253 Farm Supervisors and Specialized Livestock Workers
9222 Supervisors, Electronics Manufacturing
9415 Inspectors and Testers, Mineral and Metal Processing
9493 Other Wood Products Assemblers and Inspectors
9496 Painters and Coaters - Industrial
9615 Labourers in Rubber and Plastic Products Manufacturing

1 advertisement for each of the following :
1121 Specialists in Human Resources
1222 Executive Assistants
1233 Insurance Adjusters and Claims Examiners
1236 Customs, Ship and Other Brokers
1423 Desktop Publishing Operators and Related Occupations
1434 Banking, Insurance and Other Financial Clerks
1442 Personnel Clerks
1463 Couriers, Messengers and Door-to-Door Distributors
2123 Agricultural Representatives, Consultants and Specialists
2142 Metallurgical and Materials Engineers
2173 Software Engineers and Designers
2175 Web Designers and Developers
2221 Biological Technologists and Technicians
2231 Civil Engineering Technologists and Technicians
2241 Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technologists and Technicians
2261 Nondestructive Testers and Inspectors
3111 Specialist Physicians
3112 General Practitioners and Family Physicians
3131 Pharmacists
3142 Physiotherapists
3143 Occupational Therapists
3213 Veterinary and Animal Health Technologists and Technicians
3219 Other Medical Technologists and Technicians (Except Dental Health)
4161 Natural and Applied Science Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers
4163 Business Development Officers and Marketing Researchers and Consultants
4215 Instructors and Teachers of Persons with Disabilities
5113 Archivists
5122 Editors
5134 Dancers
5211 Library and Archive Technicians and Assistants
5223 Graphic Arts Technicians
5243 Theatre, Fashion, Exhibit and Other Creative Designers
5244 Artisans and Craftspersons
6672 Other Attendants in Accommodation and Travel
7214 Contractors and Supervisors, Metal Forming, Shaping and Erecting Trades
7215 Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
7216 Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
7217 Contractors and Supervisors, Heavy Construction Equipment Crews
7246 Telecommunications Installation and Repair Workers
7247 Cable Television Service and Maintenance Technicians
7264 Ironworkers
7334 Motorcycle and Other Related Mechanics
7335 Other Small Engine and Equipment Mechanics
7371 Crane Operators
7413 Taxi and Limousine Drivers and Chauffeurs
7422 Public Works Maintenance Equipment Operators
7433 Deck Crew, Water Transport
7434 Engine Room Crew, Water Transport
7437 Air Transport Ramp Attendants
7612 Other Trades Helpers and Labourers
8254 Nursery and Greenhouse Operators and Managers
8255 Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance Contractors and Managers
8421 Chain Saw and Skidder Operators
9414 Concrete, Clay and Stone Forming Operators
9424 Water and Waste Plant Operators
9452 Fabric, Fur and Leather Cutters
9471 Printing Machine Operators
9473 Binding and Finishing Machine Operators
9485 Assemblers, Fabricators and Inspectors, Industrial Electrical Motors and Transformers
9486 Mechanical Assemblers and Inspectors
9491 Boat Assemblers and Inspectors
9616 Labourers in Textile Processing

Getting Enough Stuff to Read

Although vast quantities of advice about résumés, preparing for interviews, searching for jobs and so on are available to job seekers on the ‘net or in public libraries little is easily available to career developers. Much of the literature that would be valuable to us is present only in university libraries or upon payment at the sites of periodicals publishers. When I finally became sufficiently frustrated at being unable to read some of Savickas’ work a couple of days ago I decided to see what might be done. Here’s an initial result, the Google Scholar immediately available highlighter.

It's a Greasemonkey script for the Mozilla Firefox browser that highlights items in a Google Scholar search result that should be available immediately at no charge. Just click and read. Clearly you can’t expect to read all of Savickas’ work with it. However, you might expect to find enough to form a useful impression of what he has said.

Here’s a sample portion of Google Scholar results:

Items that are immediately available are in 150% font. In this case they are both from ERIC. The script also notices when PDF, DOC, HTML or similar files are made available.

Incidentally, my thanks are due to Patti Stirling of the Hamilton employment community for introducing me to Firefox in the first place a few years ago. (I'm a stick in the mud.)

Friday, October 31, 2008

Fashionable? a la mode? Stylish? Um ...


Trendy! That's the word I'm looking for.

As career developers we are supposed to have good strong noses for trends. The essential idea is obviously to enable us to discuss our clients’ futures with them.

But some of us need a jump start to see trends, and I am one of those. Fortunately I’ve just found a good place to watch for advice. It’s trendwatching.com. Monthly and annual briefings are free (they will even send you email alerts or you can get the RSS feed) and you can review previous briefings.

Clearly something that you can share with clients themselves. Darned interesting!

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Report : "The meaning of work generates stress or well-being"

"MONTREAL, Oct. 29, 2008 (Canada NewsWire via COMTEX) -- Meaningful work has vitamin effects on the worker's mental health and encourages his commitment towards an organization, while work without it promotes the onset of symptoms of stress, and even distress. This is one of the findings of a study funded by the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST) on the meaning of work, mental health and organizational commitment, whose results have just been published in English. ..."

The results presented in this report are interesting enough in themselves, and the introduction makes superb reading.

See PsycPORT.

Friday, October 24, 2008

Ideas for Entrepreneurial People


OK, so you have a client who knows she's entrepreneurial, and she has verified for herself that she has the necessary attributes. What she really needs now is a bunch of business ideas to think about.

Well, here's one source. I just wish I had some that are Canadian. You wouldn't happen to know of any, would you?

Another source (added 20 November): Seth Godin, "How to make money using the Internet"

Yup, Details Seem to Sell

As career developers we have a sense that details presented in resumes and other marketing materials will help to "sell" clients—especially details given in numerical terms. We ask clients to estimate monetary savings, percentage failure rate reductions, and so on. Empirical evidence of the value of this practice doesn't seem to be exactly abundant but I've just run across some and thought I'd mention it to you.

One of the blogs I read almost every day is "Mind Hacks." Here's a quote from today's.

"Ars Technica has a fantastic article on a recent study that found that numerical specifications in adverts have a huge effect on our choices, even when they're meaningless.

The numbers can be ratings, technical details, supposed representations of quality - it doesn't seem to matter. In general, bigger is better and the study found that we tend to be swayed by the numbers even when it directly contradicts our experience.

The first test involved megapixels. The authors took a single image, and used Photoshop to create a sharper version, and one with more vivid colors; they told the students that the two versions came from different cameras. When told nothing about the cameras, about 25 percent of the students chose the one that had made the sharper image. But providing a specification reversed that. When told that the other model captured more pixels using a figure based on the diagonal of the sensor, more than half now picked it. When it comes to specs, bigger is better, too, even if the underlying property is the same. Given the value in terms of the total number of pixels captured, the preference for the supposedly high-resolution camera shot up to 75 percent."

So, what does this mean to a job seeker? Clearly, it is simply that facts are extremely influential inasmuch as they can, under some conditions, overcome another person's perception of reality.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Go ahead and network : people willing to help

Some clients ask whether those they telephone for information interviews will be willing to give up the time. Yet any of us who have done this kind of research on behalf of others or ourselves know that most people are quite willing. Here is an account of some academic research indicating that people greatly underestimate the degree to which others are willing to help.


Ask For Help: Why People Are Twice as Likely to Assist as You Think

Monday, October 13, 2008

If you run out of the test room crying ...


... then you've undoubtedly failed. You're obviously a hopelessly unstable neurotic and this new test will show you up anyway. Relax, it's ok to give up.

Quite a lot of career developers use the Myers-Briggs or True Colors or Personality Dimensions in their work and we must all wonder about tests involving self reporting, right? How much confidence should we place in these tests' results?

I've seen a couple of other on-line reports of a new test based on the Big-Five Factors that cannot be faked but here is the first one that provides some insight into how Hirsh and Paterson do it.

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

David Foote on National & International Trends

All of us who took Rob Straby's course about Trends as part of the CDP programme at Conestoga College will have read Foote's Boom, Bust and Echo. Here's an interesting video CBC interview featuring Foote.

(My thanks are due to a friend for drawing my attention to this.)

Monday, October 6, 2008

Job Ad Counts for September 2008

This table summarises advertisements that appeared on the Job Bank in September for Brantford and area, Hamilton and area and Niagara and area.

There were, for instance, 207 ads of one kind or another for ‘Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks’, as usual the group in greatest demand. Well down the list, there were 7 for ‘Production Clerks’.

More detailed reports indicating, say, summaries of compensation levels offered or of education levels demanded, are obviously possible. Let me know what you would find useful!


207 advertisements
6421 Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks

161 advertisements
9619 Other Labourers in Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities

101 advertisements
6661 Light Duty Cleaners

92 advertisements
6453 Food and Beverage Servers

83 advertisements
6242 Cooks

72 advertisements
6641 Food Counter Attendants, Kitchen Helpers and Related Occupations

69 advertisements
7411 Truck Drivers

58 advertisements
7452 Material Handlers

57 advertisements
1453 Customer Service, Information and Related Clerks

56 advertisements
7414 Delivery and Courier Service Drivers

55 advertisements
7611 Construction Trades Helpers and Labourers

53 advertisements
7265 Welders and Related Machine Operators

52 advertisements
6651 Security Guards and Related Occupations

49 advertisements
6411 Sales Representatives - Wholesale Trade (Non-Technical)

46 advertisements
1411 General Office Clerks

42 advertisements
6663 Janitors, Caretakers and Building Superintendents

39 advertisements for each of the following :
6471 Visiting Homemakers, Housekeepers and Related Occupations
8612 Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance Labourers

38 advertisements
6623 Other Elemental Sales Occupations

36 advertisements
1414 Receptionists and Switchboard Operators

30 advertisements
6435 Hotel Front Desk Clerks

29 advertisements
7231 Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors

28 advertisements for each of the following :
1471 Shippers and Receivers
4167 Recreation, Sports and Fitness Program Supervisors and Consultants

27 advertisements
8431 General Farm Workers

26 advertisements for each of the following :
7321 Automotive Service Technicians, Truck and Bus Mechanics and Mechanical Repairers
9617 Labourers in Food, Beverage and Tobacco Processing

25 advertisements
7311 Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics (Except Textile)

24 advertisements for each of the following :
6221 Technical Sales Specialists - Wholesale Trade
6433 Airline Sales and Service Agents

22 advertisements for each of the following :
3152 Registered Nurses
7271 Carpenters

21 advertisements for each of the following :
2225 Landscape and Horticulture Technicians and Specialists
6622 Grocery Clerks and Store Shelf Stockers

19 advertisements for each of the following :
4131 College and Other Vocational Instructors
6611 Cashiers

18 advertisements for each of the following :
1231 Bookkeepers
6662 Specialized Cleaners

17 advertisements for each of the following :
1431 Accounting and Related Clerks
1435 Collectors
2131 Civil Engineers
3233 Licensed Practical Nurses

16 advertisements for each of the following :
1122 Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management
6465 Other Protective Service Occupations

14 advertisements
6231 Insurance Agents and Brokers

13 advertisements for each of the following :
1221 Administrative Officers
4212 Community and Social Service Workers
4214 Early Childhood Educators and Assistants
5254 Program Leaders and Instructors in Recreation, Sport and Fitness
6452 Bartenders
6482 Estheticians, Electrologists and Related Occupations
7322 Motor Vehicle Body Repairers
7441 Residential and Commercial Installers and Servicers

12 advertisements for each of the following :
1111 Financial Auditors and Accountants
1433 Customer Service Representatives - Financial Services
6252 Bakers
6451 Maîtres d'hôtel and Hosts/Hostesses
8432 Nursery and Greenhouse Workers

11 advertisements for each of the following :
6233 Retail and Wholesale Buyers
7251 Plumbers
7421 Heavy Equipment Operators (Except Crane)

10 advertisements for each of the following :
1441 Administrative Clerks
2133 Electrical and Electronics Engineers
2232 Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians
3414 Other Assisting Occupations in Support of Health Services
4142 Elementary School and Kindergarten Teachers

9 advertisements for each of the following :
1422 Data Entry Clerks
1472 Storekeepers and Parts Clerks
2242 Electronic Service Technicians (Household and Business Equipment)
4141 Secondary School Teachers
6211 Retail Trade Supervisors
6241 Chefs
6683 Other Elemental Service Occupations
7242 Industrial Electricians
7291 Roofers and Shinglers
9422 Plastics Processing Machine Operators
9511 Machining Tool Operators
9514 Metalworking Machine Operators

8 advertisements for each of the following :
1215 Supervisors, Recording, Distributing and Scheduling Occupations
2132 Mechanical Engineers
2253 Drafting Technologists and Technicians
5124 Professional Occupations in Public Relations and Communications
6474 Babysitters, Nannies and Parents' Helpers
7282 Concrete Finishers
8256 Supervisors, Landscape and Horticulture
9495 Plastic Products Assemblers, Finishers and Inspectors
9613 Labourers in Chemical Products Processing and Utilities

7 advertisements for each of the following :
1211 Supervisors, General Office and Administrative Support Clerks
1454 Survey Interviewers and Statistical Clerks
1473 Production Clerks
1474 Purchasing and Inventory Clerks
2233 Industrial Engineering and Manufacturing Technologists and Technicians
2282 User Support Technicians
5241 Graphic Designers and Illustrators
7334 Motorcycle and Other Related Mechanics
7621 Public Works and Maintenance Labourers
7622 Railway and Motor Transport Labourers
9483 Electronics Assemblers, Fabricators, Inspectors and Testers

6 advertisements for each of the following :
1475 Dispatchers and Radio Operators
2241 Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technologists and Technicians
2261 Nondestructive Testers and Inspectors
3234 Ambulance Attendants and Other Paramedical Occupations
3235 Other Technical Occupations in Therapy and Assessment
7219 Contractors and Supervisors, Other Construction Trades, Installers, Repairers and Servicers
7263 Structural Metal and Platework Fabricators and Fitters
7313 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanics
9482 Motor Vehicle Assemblers, Inspectors and Testers
9493 Other Wood Products Assemblers and Inspectors

5 advertisements for each of the following :
1114 Other Financial Officers
2211 Chemical Technologists and Technicians
2281 Computer Network Technicians
4216 Other Instructors
6271 Hairstylists and Barbers
7217 Contractors and Supervisors, Heavy Construction Equipment Crews
7247 Cable Television Service and Maintenance Technicians
7253 Gas Fitters
7312 Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics
7412 Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators
9496 Painters and Coaters - Industrial
9611 Labourers in Mineral and Metal Processing
9612 Labourers in Metal Fabrication

4 advertisements for each of the following :
1223 Personnel and Recruitment Officers
1434 Banking, Insurance and Other Financial Clerks
1461 Mail, Postal and Related Clerks
2174 Computer Programmers and Interactive Media Developers
2175 Web Designers and Developers
2251 Architectural Technologists and Technicians
3142 Physiotherapists
4213 Employment Counsellors
5232 Other Performers
6215 Cleaning Supervisors
7294 Painters and Decorators
7351 Stationary Engineers and Auxiliary Equipment Operators
7443 Automotive Mechanical Installers and Servicers
9213 Supervisors, Food, Beverage and Tobacco Processing
9421 Chemical Plant Machine Operators
9461 Process Control and Machine Operators, Food and Beverage Processing

3 advertisements for each of the following :
1225 Purchasing Agents and Officers
1241 Secretaries (Except Legal and Medical)
1452 Correspondence, Publication and Related Clerks
2231 Civil Engineering Technologists and Technicians
2234 Construction Estimators
2252 Industrial Designers
2263 Inspectors in Public and Environmental Health and Occupational Health and Safety
3143 Occupational Therapists
4161 Natural and Applied Science Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers
4164 Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers
5223 Graphic Arts Technicians
6621 Service Station Attendants
6671 Operators and Attendants in Amusement, Recreation and Sport
6681 Dry Cleaning and Laundry Occupations
7214 Contractors and Supervisors, Metal Forming, Shaping and Erecting Trades
7245 Telecommunications Line and Cable Workers
7272 Cabinetmakers
7281 Bricklayers
7342 Tailors, Dressmakers, Furriers and Milliners
7437 Air Transport Ramp Attendants
8253 Farm Supervisors and Specialized Livestock Workers
9411 Machine Operators, Mineral and Metal Processing
9412 Foundry Workers
9442 Weavers, Knitters and Other Fabric-Making Occupations
9451 Sewing Machine Operators

2 advertisements for each of the following :
1112 Financial and Investment Analysts
1212 Supervisors, Finance and Insurance Clerks
1424 Telephone Operators
1442 Personnel Clerks
2142 Metallurgical and Materials Engineers
2154 Land Surveyors
2212 Geological and Mineral Technologists and Technicians
2264 Construction Inspectors
4121 University Professors
4153 Family, Marriage and Other Related Counsellors
4163 Business Development Officers and Marketing Researchers and Consultants
4166 Education Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers
5212 Technical Occupations Related to Museums and Art Galleries
5244 Artisans and Craftspersons
6251 Butchers, Meat Cutters and Fishmongers - Retail and Wholesale
6431 Travel Counsellors
6472 Elementary and Secondary School Teacher Assistants
6672 Other Attendants in Accommodation and Travel
7211 Supervisors, Machinists and Related Occupations
7222 Supervisors, Motor Transport and Other Ground Transit Operators
7241 Electricians (Except Industrial and Power System)
7252 Steamfitters, Pipefitters and Sprinkler System Installers
7261 Sheet Metal Workers
7264 Ironworkers
7331 Oil and Solid Fuel Heating Mechanics
7371 Crane Operators
9484 Assemblers and Inspectors, Electrical Appliance, Apparatus and Equipment Manufacturing
9486 Mechanical Assemblers and Inspectors

1 advertisement for each of the following :
1121 Specialists in Human Resources
1242 Legal Secretaries
1243 Medical Secretaries
1244 Court Recorders and Medical Transcriptionists
1423 Desktop Publishing Operators and Related Occupations
1451 Library Clerks
1463 Couriers, Messengers and Door-to-Door Distributors
2147 Computer Engineers (Except Software Engineers and Designers)
2171 Information Systems Analysts and Consultants
2173 Software Engineers and Designers
2221 Biological Technologists and Technicians
2243 Industrial Instrument Technicians and Mechanics
3144 Other Professional Occupations in Therapy and Assessment
3216 Medical Sonographers
3411 Dental Assistants
3413 Nurse Aides, Orderlies and Patient Service Associates
4211 Paralegal and Related Occupations
5122 Editors
5221 Photographers
5225 Audio and Video Recording Technicians
5242 Interior Designers
6212 Food Service Supervisors
6213 Executive Housekeepers
6441 Tour and Travel Guides
6443 Casino Occupations
6483 Pet Groomers and Animal Care Workers
6682 Ironing, Pressing and Finishing Occupations
7215 Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
7216 Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
7246 Telecommunications Installation and Repair Workers
7283 Tilesetters
7284 Plasterers, Drywall Installers and Finishers and Lathers
7292 Glaziers
7295 Floor Covering Installers
7316 Machine Fitters
7335 Other Small Engine and Equipment Mechanics
7352 Power Systems and Power Station Operators
7422 Public Works Maintenance Equipment Operators
7445 Other Repairers and Servicers
8421 Chain Saw and Skidder Operators
8611 Harvesting Labourers
9212 Supervisors, Petroleum, Gas and Chemical Processing and Utilities
9224 Supervisors, Furniture and Fixtures Manufacturing
9415 Inspectors and Testers, Mineral and Metal Processing
9423 Rubber Processing Machine Operators and Related Workers
9424 Water and Waste Plant Operators
9443 Textile Dyeing and Finishing Machine Operators
9462 Industrial Butchers and Meat Cutters, Poultry Preparers and Related Workers
9471 Printing Machine Operators
9481 Aircraft Assemblers and Aircraft Assembly Inspectors
9491 Boat Assemblers and Inspectors
9492 Furniture and Fixture Assemblers and Inspectors
9494 Furniture Finishers and Refinishers
9498 Other Assemblers and Inspectors
9615 Labourers in Rubber and Plastic Products Manufacturing

Monday, September 29, 2008

Photojournalist James Nachtwey's TEDPrize Story Breaks 3 October



Watch James Nachtwey as he makes his TED Prize wish:


Wednesday, September 24, 2008

I'm a slow reader myself ...

This usually means that borrowing from the library is out because I can't read a book in the time allowed. And then there are those fines.

On the other hand I do like books. But buying them can be expensive. Although this is not the usual line of this blog I thought I might mention some sources I have found for used books.

For most of these just follow the link and then enter the information available to you, such as the book title or author.

A libris

Chapters Indigo : In this case you might wish to click on the 'advanced search' link first.

Abe Books

Amazon in Canada : Here you should search for the book that you want then click on the link that mentions 'used & new.'

Recycled Reading

Incidentally I looked for and found Vance Peavy's famous book about constructivist counselling on each of these sites and noticed a great range of prices. As any real shopper would tell you it pays to look around.



And, for those deprived of a familiarity with Blackadder here's a quotation from one of the programmes that explains the title of this blog item. Dr Johnson (Robbie Coltrane), the Great Lexicographer, meets the Prince of Wales (Hugh Laurie), introduced by Blackadder (Rowan Atkinson). Apparently the Prince of Wales was a lot like me.

video

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Dig Deeper Interviews

We all know from experience how difficult it is to match people to jobs—or to be matched successfully to a job, for that matter. That’s why I enjoy reading Lou Adler’s advice and why I’ve just added his blog to my blogroll.

Here's one of my favourite articles, Random Chance and How Managers Make Faulty Hiring Decisions. From what I have seen interviewers usually fail to follow up on the questions they ask of job candidates. They need to feel the material and give it a stretch. Adler tells you how.

And incidentally, if you found my previous blog item somewhat perplexing I've added a sentence or two near the end. I hope they help.

Monday, September 8, 2008

Wash Your Hands First

No, I'm not referring to occasions like this. (You wash your hands after these.) I mean something else.

You know how some employment counsellors advise job seekers to wash their hands in warm water and then dry them thoroughly just before interviews? Well I suspect that there's now a scientific explanation of a kind for this.

The psychological phenomenon that might explain the benefits of washing your hands first is often associated with Dr John Bargh of Yale and it's called priming. See if you agree with me. If you get the chance watch the BBC programme "Horizon: How to Make Better Decisions" which contains a segment about priming. If you can't do that then see the highlights here.

In essence, if an interviewer is asked to hold a hot drink before they meet a job candidate then they will view that candidate favorably; if they are asked to hold a cold drink then they will oppose hiring the candidate. Wash your hands in warm water before your interview. Don't be flushed away.

Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Job Ad Counts for August 2008

This table summarises advertisements that appeared on the Job Bank in August for Brantford and area, Hamilton and area and Niagara and area.

There were, for instance, 182 vacancies of one kind or another for ‘Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks’, as usual the group in greatest demand. There were also 57 for ‘Customer Service, Information and Related Clerks’.

More detailed reports indicating, say, summaries of compensation levels offered or of education levels demanded, are obviously possible. Let me know what you would find useful!


182 advertisements
6421 Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks

102 advertisements
9619 Other Labourers in Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities

98 advertisements
6242 Cooks

89 advertisements
6453 Food and Beverage Servers

85 advertisements
6661 Light Duty Cleaners

76 advertisements
6641 Food Counter Attendants, Kitchen Helpers and Related Occupations

66 advertisements
7411 Truck Drivers

57 advertisements
1453 Customer Service, Information and Related Clerks

50 advertisements
7452 Material Handlers

44 advertisements
1414 Receptionists and Switchboard Operators

43 advertisements
6411 Sales Representatives - Wholesale Trade (Non-Technical)

41 advertisements
7414 Delivery and Courier Service Drivers

40 advertisements for each of the following :
6471 Visiting Homemakers, Housekeepers and Related Occupations
7265 Welders and Related Machine Operators
7611 Construction Trades Helpers and Labourers

39 advertisements
1411 General Office Clerks

37 advertisements for each of the following :
6651 Security Guards and Related Occupations
8612 Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance Labourers

34 advertisements
6435 Hotel Front Desk Clerks

33 advertisements
6233 Retail and Wholesale Buyers

32 advertisements
9617 Labourers in Food, Beverage and Tobacco Processing

31 advertisements for each of the following :
1471 Shippers and Receivers
6611 Cashiers

30 advertisements
6623 Other Elemental Sales Occupations

26 advertisements
7311 Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics (Except Textile)

23 advertisements
6663 Janitors, Caretakers and Building Superintendents

21 advertisements for each of the following :
1433 Customer Service Representatives - Financial Services
7421 Heavy Equipment Operators (Except Crane)

20 advertisements for each of the following :
1431 Accounting and Related Clerks
5254 Program Leaders and Instructors in Recreation, Sport and Fitness
6452 Bartenders
7321 Automotive Service Technicians, Truck and Bus Mechanics and Mechanical Repairers

18 advertisements for each of the following :
2225 Landscape and Horticulture Technicians and Specialists
6662 Specialized Cleaners

17 advertisements for each of the following :
3152 Registered Nurses
4212 Community and Social Service Workers
6231 Insurance Agents and Brokers
7231 Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors

15 advertisements for each of the following :
3233 Licensed Practical Nurses
4131 College and Other Vocational Instructors
6451 Maîtres d'hôtel and Hosts/Hostesses

14 advertisements for each of the following :
6211 Retail Trade Supervisors
6622 Grocery Clerks and Store Shelf Stockers

13 advertisements for each of the following :
2233 Industrial Engineering and Manufacturing Technologists and Technicians
6465 Other Protective Service Occupations
7441 Residential and Commercial Installers and Servicers

12 advertisements for each of the following :
2132 Mechanical Engineers
4214 Early Childhood Educators and Assistants
6221 Technical Sales Specialists - Wholesale Trade
6241 Chefs
7322 Motor Vehicle Body Repairers

11 advertisements for each of the following :
1473 Production Clerks
2242 Electronic Service Technicians (Household and Business Equipment)
6683 Other Elemental Service Occupations
7271 Carpenters
9612 Labourers in Metal Fabrication

10 advertisements for each of the following :
1474 Purchasing and Inventory Clerks
2131 Civil Engineers
2234 Construction Estimators
2253 Drafting Technologists and Technicians
4167 Recreation, Sports and Fitness Program Supervisors and Consultants
7241 Electricians (Except Industrial and Power System)
9514 Metalworking Machine Operators

9 advertisements for each of the following :
1231 Bookkeepers
1472 Storekeepers and Parts Clerks
6433 Airline Sales and Service Agents
6474 Babysitters, Nannies and Parents' Helpers
6482 Estheticians, Electrologists and Related Occupations
6681 Dry Cleaning and Laundry Occupations
7312 Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics

8 advertisements for each of the following :
1215 Supervisors, Recording, Distributing and Scheduling Occupations
1221 Administrative Officers
1435 Collectors
7621 Public Works and Maintenance Labourers
8431 General Farm Workers
9461 Process Control and Machine Operators, Food and Beverage Processing
9495 Plastic Products Assemblers, Finishers and Inspectors
9496 Painters and Coaters - Industrial
9511 Machining Tool Operators

7 advertisements for each of the following :
1441 Administrative Clerks
2232 Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians
6671 Operators and Attendants in Amusement, Recreation and Sport
7622 Railway and Motor Transport Labourers

6 advertisements for each of the following :
1122 Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management
1223 Personnel and Recruitment Officers
2211 Chemical Technologists and Technicians
5124 Professional Occupations in Public Relations and Communications
5241 Graphic Designers and Illustrators
7242 Industrial Electricians
7282 Concrete Finishers
7443 Automotive Mechanical Installers and Servicers

5 advertisements for each of the following :
1225 Purchasing Agents and Officers
1242 Legal Secretaries
1461 Mail, Postal and Related Clerks
2241 Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technologists and Technicians
3414 Other Assisting Occupations in Support of Health Services
4142 Elementary School and Kindergarten Teachers
4213 Employment Counsellors
6215 Cleaning Supervisors
6252 Bakers
7253 Gas Fitters
7263 Structural Metal and Platework Fabricators and Fitters
7272 Cabinetmakers
8256 Supervisors, Landscape and Horticulture
8432 Nursery and Greenhouse Workers
9422 Plastics Processing Machine Operators
9482 Motor Vehicle Assemblers, Inspectors and Testers
9493 Other Wood Products Assemblers and Inspectors
9613 Labourers in Chemical Products Processing and Utilities

4 advertisements for each of the following :
1212 Supervisors, Finance and Insurance Clerks
1241 Secretaries (Except Legal and Medical)
1442 Personnel Clerks
1454 Survey Interviewers and Statistical Clerks
2133 Electrical and Electronics Engineers
2141 Industrial and Manufacturing Engineers
2282 User Support Technicians
3411 Dental Assistants
4141 Secondary School Teachers
4216 Other Instructors
5221 Photographers
6212 Food Service Supervisors
6431 Travel Counsellors
6483 Pet Groomers and Animal Care Workers
6672 Other Attendants in Accommodation and Travel
7281 Bricklayers
7291 Roofers and Shinglers
7334 Motorcycle and Other Related Mechanics
7371 Crane Operators
7412 Bus Drivers, Subway Operators and Other Transit Operators
9498 Other Assemblers and Inspectors

3 advertisements for each of the following :
1111 Financial Auditors and Accountants
1211 Supervisors, General Office and Administrative Support Clerks
1244 Court Recorders and Medical Transcriptionists
1422 Data Entry Clerks
2171 Information Systems Analysts and Consultants
2174 Computer Programmers and Interactive Media Developers
2212 Geological and Mineral Technologists and Technicians
5121 Authors and Writers
5133 Musicians and Singers
5135 Actors and Comedians
6434 Ticket Agents, Cargo Service Representatives and Related Clerks (Except Airline)
6621 Service Station Attendants
7216 Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
7247 Cable Television Service and Maintenance Technicians
7251 Plumbers
7261 Sheet Metal Workers
7313 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanics
7612 Other Trades Helpers and Labourers
9411 Machine Operators, Mineral and Metal Processing
9415 Inspectors and Testers, Mineral and Metal Processing
9483 Electronics Assemblers, Fabricators, Inspectors and Testers
9486 Mechanical Assemblers and Inspectors

2 advertisements for each of the following :
1121 Specialists in Human Resources
1222 Executive Assistants
1226 Conference and Event Planners
1236 Customs, Ship and Other Brokers
1432 Payroll Clerks
1463 Couriers, Messengers and Door-to-Door Distributors
2112 Chemists
2134 Chemical Engineers
2147 Computer Engineers (Except Software Engineers and Designers)
2173 Software Engineers and Designers
2231 Civil Engineering Technologists and Technicians
2243 Industrial Instrument Technicians and Mechanics
2252 Industrial Designers
2281 Computer Network Technicians
3142 Physiotherapists
3235 Other Technical Occupations in Therapy and Assessment
4152 Social Workers
4153 Family, Marriage and Other Related Counsellors
5243 Theatre, Fashion, Exhibit and Other Creative Designers
5252 Coaches
6271 Hairstylists and Barbers
7217 Contractors and Supervisors, Heavy Construction Equipment Crews
7219 Contractors and Supervisors, Other Construction Trades, Installers, Repairers and Servicers
7232 Tool and Die Makers
7245 Telecommunications Line and Cable Workers
7294 Painters and Decorators
7295 Floor Covering Installers
7351 Stationary Engineers and Auxiliary Equipment Operators
7413 Taxi and Limousine Drivers and Chauffeurs
7437 Air Transport Ramp Attendants
8253 Farm Supervisors and Specialized Livestock Workers
8421 Chain Saw and Skidder Operators
8611 Harvesting Labourers
9451 Sewing Machine Operators
9465 Testers and Graders, Food and Beverage Processing
9484 Assemblers and Inspectors, Electrical Appliance, Apparatus and Equipment Manufacturing
9513 Woodworking Machine Operators
9611 Labourers in Mineral and Metal Processing

1 advertisement for each of the following :
1114 Other Financial Officers
1224 Property Administrators
1243 Medical Secretaries
1413 Records Management and Filing Clerks
1423 Desktop Publishing Operators and Related Occupations
1424 Telephone Operators
1434 Banking, Insurance and Other Financial Clerks
2115 Other Professional Occupations in Physical Sciences
2172 Database Analysts and Data Administrators
2213 Meteorological Technicians
2221 Biological Technologists and Technicians
2261 Nondestructive Testers and Inspectors
3112 General Practitioners and Family Physicians
3131 Pharmacists
3132 Dietitians and Nutritionists
3143 Occupational Therapists
3413 Nurse Aides, Orderlies and Patient Service Associates
4155 Probation and Parole Officers and Related Occupations
4161 Natural and Applied Science Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers
4164 Social Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers
4169 Other Professional Occupations in Social Science, n.e.c.
4211 Paralegal and Related Occupations
4215 Instructors and Teachers of Persons with Disabilities
5113 Archivists
5131 Producers, Directors, Choreographers and Related Occupations
5134 Dancers
5212 Technical Occupations Related to Museums and Art Galleries
5223 Graphic Arts Technicians
5225 Audio and Video Recording Technicians
5231 Announcers and Other Broadcasters
6216 Other Service Supervisors
6232 Real Estate Agents and Salespersons
6251 Butchers, Meat Cutters and Fishmongers - Retail and Wholesale
6441 Tour and Travel Guides
6463 By-Law Enforcement and Other Regulatory Officers, n.e.c.
6481 Image, Social and Other Personal Consultants
7214 Contractors and Supervisors, Metal Forming, Shaping and Erecting Trades
7215 Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
7264 Ironworkers
7292 Glaziers
7293 Insulators
7331 Oil and Solid Fuel Heating Mechanics
7332 Electric Appliance Servicers and Repairers
7335 Other Small Engine and Equipment Mechanics
7352 Power Systems and Power Station Operators
7381 Printing Press Operators
7383 Other Trades and Related Occupations
7445 Other Repairers and Servicers
8211 Supervisors, Logging and Forestry
8255 Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance Contractors and Managers
8615 Oil and Gas Drilling, Servicing and Related Labourers
9212 Supervisors, Petroleum, Gas and Chemical Processing and Utilities
9213 Supervisors, Food, Beverage and Tobacco Processing
9232 Petroleum, Gas and Chemical Process Operators
9412 Foundry Workers
9414 Concrete, Clay and Stone Forming Operators
9421 Chemical Plant Machine Operators
9424 Water and Waste Plant Operators
9443 Textile Dyeing and Finishing Machine Operators
9471 Printing Machine Operators
9472 Camera, Platemaking and Other Prepress Occupations
9491 Boat Assemblers and Inspectors
9492 Furniture and Fixture Assemblers and Inspectors
9615 Labourers in Rubber and Plastic Products Manufacturing

Monday, September 1, 2008

... and then there's Cultural Humility

Here's the article by Rob McInnes that introduced me to the basic idea just this morning. At this very early point in my study of this area I sense that the exercises in self-reflection offered in one of the articles cited by McInnes would make a useful complement to any competence one might have in understanding one or more other cultures.

Sunday, August 31, 2008

Client Marketing

When the majority of employers function as recruiters they behave more like customers (or, more evocatively, like shoppers) than like managers. Accordingly it makes good sense to the bear the basic theory of value propositions in mind when creating a marketing plan and marketing documents such as résumés with a job seeker.

According to wikipedia on customer value proposition:

A value-proposition should contain at least five elements:
  1. current situation (including problems, causes and effects)
  2. target situation
  3. when to reach the target situation
  4. cost of reaching the target situation and opportunity cost analysis
  5. the benefits of both the targeting and the achievement phases
Of course many an employer will ask a candidate what they know about the enterprise. The employer wants to feel that the candidate understands the employer's predicament. Conversely, an especially attractive candidate will not need to be told what the employer's targets are.

Since the candidate is offering a complete proposition to an employer they should be able to indicate an awareness of timing. For example, the employer might want to know what they can do to deal with possible short-term backlogs or the absence of a long-term plan. The candidate must also show how previous results and skills will take the employer from their current situation to the target situation.

Having written this, just remember : Don't be downhearted. There are lots of good résumés and lots of bad ones. Many that are good don't get jobs, many that are bad do.

Thursday, August 28, 2008

Does Everybody Do This?


The image to the left shows my own suitability ratings on Career Cruising for the occupation of Bereavement Counsellor. Whenever I use this instrument with a client I find myself using significant time discussing how the ratings systems can be manipulated (if desired) and how any one of the items in the instrument might interact with an overall result. Is this what you find?

Here's an example. I responded to the item "Coping with unpleasant or upsetting situations" with a somewhat lukewarm "Like". I did this because none of the situations I though of as I was responding involved me in a supportive role. I would be interested in watching for an opportunity to provide help but would not get the true high of being there and meant to help. However, selecting this option for this item would reduce the rank for this occupation for me. Again, what I'm pointing out is that, although I find Career Cruising very useful, it's worth re-examining responses to individual items in the light of overall patterns that the instrument may have exposed for the client.

And this is where the instrument really shines because one can change the response to an individual item and it will re-assess the subject. By changing just one item at a time a careful subject can begin to form intuitions about the various factors that are influencing their career evaluations and they are provided with a neat series of prioritised list of occupations that are clearly within the control of their own preferences. There is also lots of room for career developers to add value.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Targeting Contacts for Information Interviews

We have been working with a client who is exploring various possibilities based on her Career Cruiser results. One interesting career possibility for her would be that of Child and Youth Worker (CYW). Gratifyingly, she is willing to pursue some information interviews to learn what employers might expect and require of her. Here's one item that we have prepared to help her to do this. It's a list of employers that have advertised for one or more CYWs in certain broad geographical areas in recent months categorised by municipal area, prepared from Job Bank advertisements.

Baltimore, Ontario
Falconhurst
Guelph, Ontario
Avalon
Hamilton Downtown / Flamborough / Dundas, Ontario
The Community Adolescent Network of Hamilton
YMCA of Hamilton/Burlington
Life-Center Foster Homes
The Salvation Army - Grace Haven
Hamilton area, Ontario
Banyan Community Services
Kitchener, Ontario
Pioneer Youth Services
Lindsay & Little Britain, Ontario
Boys and Girls Clubs of Kawartha Lakes
Lindsay, Ontario
Hawk Residential Care and Treatment Homes Inc.
Boys and Girls Clubs of Kawartha Lakes
Niagara Falls, Ontario
Boys and Girls Club of Niagara
Norwood, Ontario, Ontario
MON AMI CHILDREN SERVICES
Oakwood and Lindsay, Ontario
Hawk Residential Care and Treatment Homes Inc.
Oakwood, Ontario
Hawk Residential Care and Treatment Homes Inc.
Ospringe, Ontario
Avalon
Peterborough, Ontario
Phoenix Residential Treatment Services
MON AMI CHILDREN SERVICES
Toronto North, Ontario
Dorvict Home and Health Care Services (Placement Agency)
Toronto, Ontario
Storey Homes Ltd
Waterloo, Ontario
Pioneer Youth Services
Saint Monica House
Lutherwood
Welland, Ontario
Banyan Community Services
Family and Children's Services Niagara
Our client now has a sample of employers to call. With other information that we will also supply that includes summaries of credentials that employers expect and of the "Other Information" portion of the Job Bank ads—and some practice interviews—our client should be well prepared to find out all she wants to know during her interviews.